Italians voted in parliamentary elections yesterday. The exit polls released by the national broadcaster Rai indicate that the Brothers of Italy party led by Giorgia Meloni won the clear majority (22.5%-26.5% of the vote). Meloni is set to become Italy’s next prime minister and form the new cabinet. Meloni’s populist leanings are almost identical to those of Hungary’s Viktor Orban who has been a major thorn in the Eurocrats’ side.She is also seen by many as too friendly to Russia’s Vladimir Putin – or at least not sufficiently hostile. As far as the European Commission’s (EC) President Ursula von der Leyen’s is concerned, the Italians voted wrong.

Just before the elections she said, “We will see the result of the vote in Italy. If things go in a difficult direction – and I’ve spoken about Hungary and Poland – we have the tools.” The tools Von der Leyen was referring to is the EC’s ability to cut funding to member states that defy the “rule of law,” as defined by the Eurocrats. But von der Leyen’s statements only further enflamed popular resentment against Brussels.

Former Prime Minister and leader of the Lega party, Matteo Salvini tweeted, „What is this a threat? This is shameful arrogance.“ In an appearance on Italian TV he called EC’s actions “institutional bullying,“ and stated that “if anyone in Brussels thinks of cutting the funds that belong to Italy, because the League wins the elections, then we have to rethink this Europe.” Polish Prime Minister, Mateusz Morawiecki was harsher still: “Ms. Von der Leyen’s statement is outrageous. Is this democracy, is this the rule of law? That Eurocrats in Brussels dictate what the government should be like? Who should choose governments? Should the European nations or Brussels and Berlin consult and dictate what the governments should be? This is not the rule of law, this is a dictate and the absence of the rule of law.“ He added that the real values Europeans should strive for are, “Democracy, sovereignty, national governments, not bureaucrats from Brussels who will dictate, blackmail, intimidate, put pressure on others.“

At the time when the Eurocrats are falling over themselves to boast about their unity and common policy based on shared values, the reality is that the European project is coming apart at the seams. It remains to be seen, however, whether the Italian people will get the change they voted for, whether Meloni’s populism is real or fake, whether she’ll prove the champion of the people or is she merely controlled opposition. There’s no doubt that her rhetoric is compelling to those yearning to defend their Italian identity and heritage based in family values and Christianity, but her meteoric rise from almost total obscurity (during the last elections in 2018, her party won only 4% of the vote) to winning yesterday’s elections might also incite suspicions.

Becoming a member of the powerful Aspen Institute last February might have something to do with it. Headquartered in Washington, D. C., the “think tank” is funded by some of the most powerful globalist forces in the world including the Gates Foundation, Ford Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Carnegie Corporation and Lumina Foundation. Giorgia Meloni talks a good talk for the electorate; we’ll find out whether she’ll also walk the walk.

Either way, the EU is currently facing massive and gathering financial, economic and social headwinds which are sure to add fuel to populist movements across the continent. As the economy falters, inflation continues to rage and the common currency craters, the continent’s future seems bleak. EU’s fake democracy won’t work for much longer and one of the globalists’ favorite projects is set to collapse; it is the question of when, not if.

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